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Visit Washington, DC

Visiting Information

The National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC, is open to the public. Timed-entry passes are required for all visitors. Plan your visit to the museum in Washington, DC.

Open 11 AM–4 PM
Wednesday–Sunday, except Dec. 25
Closed Monday and Tuesday

Mitsitam Cafe
Temporarily closed

Mitsitam Espresso Coffee Bar
Temporarily closed

Museum Store
Temporarily closed

imagiNATIONS Activity Center
Temporarily closed

Admission is free, but timed-entry passes are required for visitors of all ages. The building is accessible to people with disabilities.

The National Museum of the American Indian is located on the National Mall between the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum and the U.S. Capitol Building. All visitors, except for pre-registered groups, must enter through the eastern-facing doors nearest 3rd Street SW. The group entrance is on Maryland Avenue nearest 4th Street SW.

Metro and Bus
The nearest Metro station is L'Enfant Plaza (Blue/Orange/Silver/Green/Yellow lines). Exit toward Maryland Avenue/Smithsonian Museums. Walk two blocks east (toward the U.S. Capitol Building) on Maryland Avenue. Bus lines are 30, 32, 34-36—Friendship Heights/Southern Avenue. Visit www.wmata.com or call 202-637-7000 for more information.

Parking and Drop-Off
The museum does not have a public parking facility. Metered public parking is available on surrounding streets and a number of commercial parking facilities are convenient to the museum. See the Smithsonian's Parking Map for details. Parking on the National Mall is managed by the National Park Service. Visit the National Park Service website for more information. Bus drop-offs are allowed on Maryland Avenue only.

The museum offers self-guided experiences for students to learn about Indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere while exploring our exhibitions. Registration is not required for groups visiting the museum's public spaces on their own. General visitor information is available on the Visit page.

Individuals and groups may also choose to use the museum's Self Guides and other educational resources related to current exhibitions:

Adult chaperones are required for all student groups. Chaperones must supervise and remain with their groups at all times. Groups that are inadequately supervised during their visit may be asked to leave the building. Groups of students Grade 3 and below require a ratio of one (1) chaperone for every five (5) students. Groups of students Grade 4 and up require a ratio of one (1) adult for every ten (10) students.

The museum's security procedures ensure visitor safety and the protection of objects in the museum. Smithsonian security personnel conduct a thorough but speedy hand-check of visitors' bags, briefcases, purses, strollers, and containers. Visitors are required to walk through a metal detector. Those who are unable to do so are hand-screened with an electronic wand by security personnel. Help speed entry into the museum by having all purses or bags open and ready for inspection, and pockets emptied before going through the screening station. Please note there may be a line to enter the museum on busy days. Security policies and a list of prohibited items are available on the Smithsonian's Security page.

Image of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC
National Museum of the American Indian
National Mall
Fourth Street & Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20560

11 AM–4 PM
Wednesday–Sunday, except Dec. 25
Closed Monday and Tuesday

Exhibition Highlights and Resources

Americans exhibition in Washington, DC image
Americans
American Indian images, names, and stories infuse American history and contemporary life. Americans highlights the ways in which American Indians have been part of the nation's identity since before the country began. It will surround visitors with images, delve into the three stories, and invite them to begin a conversation about why this phenomenon exists.
Nation to Nation exhibition in Washington, DC image
Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations
From a young age, most Americans learn about the Founding Fathers, but are told very little about equally important and influential Native diplomats and leaders of Indian Nations. Treaties lie at the heart of the relationship between Indian Nations and the United States, and Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations is the story of that relationship, including the history and legacy of U.S.—American Indian diplomacy from the colonial period through the present.
The Great Inka Road exhibition in Washington, DC image
The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire
The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire explores the foundations of the Inka Road in earlier Andean cultures, technologies that made building the road possible, the cosmology and political organization of the Inka world, and the legacy of the Inka Empire during the colonial period and in the present day.