Rebuilding After Removal

Rebuilding After Removal

<em>International Indian Council,</em> 1843. Painting by John Mix Stanley. Smithsonian American Art Museum 1985.66.248, 934B
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ᎤᎾᎴᏂᏐᏗ ᏕᎨᏥᎧᎲᏒᎢ.

Rebuilding After Removal

ᏂᎬᏂᏱᎸᏒᏊ ᎠᎴ ᏂᏓᎾᏓᏲᏍᎬᎾ

Perseverance and Determination

Once the last of Cherokee detachments reached Indian Territory, the tribe set about reunifying.

International Indian Council, 1843. Painting by John Mix Stanley. Smithsonian American Art Museum 1985.66.248, 934B

In 1839, the Cherokee Nation passed an

In 1839, the Cherokee Nation passed an

A constitution was ratified soon after, which reinstated three authoritative branches of government: executive, legislative, and judicial. The Cherokee Nation reestablished an education system, a tribal newspaper, and various other support programs designed to provide for its people.

Image of International Indian Council, 1843

<em>International Indian Council,</em> 1843. Painting by John Mix Stanley. Smithsonian American Art Museum 1985.66.248, 934B
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The Cherokee Nation met with other Indian nations in Indian Territory in the summer of 1843 to discuss their nation-to-nation relationships with one another and with the United States.
International Indian Council, 1843. Painting by John Mix Stanley. Smithsonian American Art Museum 1985.66.248, 934B

Cherokee citizens rebuilt their lives. They established new homes and businesses, and Cherokee Nation thrived once again, despite the odds.

Cherokee citizens rebuilt their lives. They established new homes and businesses, and Cherokee Nation thrived once again, despite the odds.

Image of Cherokee Female Seminary

<em>Cherokee Female Seminary.</em> Photograph Courtesy of Oklahoma Historical Society, Grant Forman Collection
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In 1851, the Cherokee Nation established the Cherokee Female Seminary, the first institution of higher learning for female students west of the Mississippi River. A male seminary was also established and opened around the same time.

Cherokee Female Seminary. Photograph Courtesy of Oklahoma Historical Society, Grant Forman Collection
<em>Cherokee National Supreme Court Building.</em> Courtesy of Cherokee National Archives, Cherokee Heritage Center
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A courthouse for the Cherokee National Supreme and District Courts was built in 1844. Today, it is the oldest surviving governmental building in the state of Oklahoma.

Cherokee National Supreme Court Building. Courtesy of Cherokee National Archives, Cherokee Heritage Center

Determination

Video poster

Discussion Questions

Discussion Questions

  • 1|
    What challenges did the Cherokee face upon their arrival in Indian Territory?
  • 2|
    What actions did the Cherokee take to reestablish themselves in Indian Territory?