National Museum of the American Indian | Smithsonian
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Upcoming

These live and interactive programs introduce educators to NK360° and its extensive resources. Webinars and onsite programs are designed to support education professionals in learning approaches to incorporate more complete narratives about Native American histories, cultures, and contemporary lives into their teaching. View recorded webinars.

photograph of Dr. Khal Schneider
Online

California Indian History Before and After the Gold Rush

July 23, 2024

1–2:30 PM ET

Free | Registration required


The California gold rush is one of the most iconic stories in American history. While the gold rush is taught in almost every U.S. history class in the United States, often left out is the Native American experience before, during, and after this brief but pivotal time period. Take a deep dive with Dr. Khal Schneider (Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria) into the complex history behind the California gold rush and its impact on the Native peoples of California. Recommended for teachers of grades 4–12.

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photograph of Taylor Pennwell standing in a wooded area
Online

Teaching the Impact of the Gold Rush on Native Americans of California: A Source Investigation

July 24, 2024

1–2:30 PM ET

Free | Registration required


Experience NK360°’s newest online lesson with Taylor Pennewell (Berry Creek Rancheria of Tyme Maidu Indians), executive director of the Native advocacy nonprofit Redbud Resource Group and a former teacher. The Impact of the Gold Rush on Native Americans of California asks students to analyze primary sources, maps, images, and history to answer the question: Do American actions against the Native peoples of California during the gold rush meet the United Nations definition of genocide? The session will walk teachers through the lesson and share recommended extension options for educators with additional time in their curricula. This lesson is designed for grades 8–12 but is open to teachers of grades 4–12.

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educators sitting around a table focused on an individual holding up a book
Onsite | Graton Resort and Casino

Teaching the Impact of the Gold Rush on Native Americans of California: A Source Investigation

August 1, 2024

9 AM–3 PM (PST)

Graton Resort and Casino
288 Golf Course Drive West
Rohnert Park, CA 94928

Free | Registration required


Join the education team from the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian at Graton Resort and Casino to explore the newest Native Knowledge 360° lesson, The Impact of the Gold Rush on Native Americans of California. This Professional Development is for educators of grade 4 and up.

This primary source investigation provides newspaper articles, maps, images, and Native survivor accounts to offer teachers and students insight into a little-known but vitally important aspect of one of the most iconic events in American history—the California gold rush.

The lesson, designed for 8th–12th grade students, provides sources to answer the question: Do American actions against California Native Americans during the gold rush meet the United Nations definition of genocide?

The day will begin with welcome remarks from Greg Sarris, Ph.D., Chairman of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria. Dr. Khal Schneider (Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria) will then provide a historical introduction to the gold rush. Taylor Pennewell (Tyme Maidu Nation, Berry Creek Rancheria), Executive Director of the Redbud Resource Group, will guide teachers through the lesson along with offering approaches for using the lesson in the classroom.

Attending teachers will receive resources and a certificate of participation.

Lead funding for the Native Knowledge 360° education initiative provided by the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies, and Bonnie and Jere Broh-Kahn.


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facade of the National Museum of the American Indian
Washington, DC

2024 Indigenous Peoples’ Day Curriculum Teach-In

September 28, 2024

9:30 AM–2 PM ET

$20 | Registration required


The eighth annual Indigenous Peoples’ Day Curriculum Teach-In, in collaboration with Teaching for Change, is an opportunity for educators to convene in person and strategize ways to uplift Native voices by bringing them directly into the classroom. Recommended for teachers of grades K–12.

Teachers play a crucial role in advancing the museum's work to transform popular understandings of Native histories, cultures, and contemporary lives. Participants can select two workshop breakout sessions. Each session provides resource-rich experiences, such as classroom lessons about Native peoples and topics, resources from Teaching for Change and the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), and strategies for effectively incorporating the museum's exhibitions in Washington, DC, into classroom curricula. The goal of the Teach-In is to support awareness of the NMAI's Native Knowledge 360° (NK360°) national education initiative, which promotes improved teaching about Native American communities, and its classroom lessons.

Coffee, snacks, and a catered lunch will be provided.


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NMAI New York, NY and NMAI Washington, DC
Online

edX Course: Foundations for Transforming Teaching and Learning about Native Americans

Through November 7, 2024

Free | Registration required


In this course, learners will explore the impact problematic narratives about Native Americans have on American society and student education, as well as learn ways to recognize and share more complete narratives, both inside and outside the classroom.

In addition, learners will explore Native Knowledge 360° (NK360°), the National Museum of the American Indian's national initiative to inspire and support transformative teaching and learning about Native Americans.

This course, based off a three-part live webinar series taught by educators at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian, is designed for education professionals who are new to incorporating more complete narratives about Native American histories, cultures, and contemporary lives into their teaching. Educators whose primary teaching focus is social studies, English language arts, or library sciences and who work with students in grades 4–12 are encouraged to enroll. Homeschoolers, parents, and others looking for digital educational resources about Native Americans can also register.


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