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Recorded Webinars

View webinars hosted by the Education department of the National Museum of the American Indian. Find topics that support teaching and learning about Native Americans. View upcoming webinars.

Teacher Workshop Series | Indigenous Women: Artists and Activists

Teacher Workshop Series | Indigenous Women: Artists and Activists

Part 1 of a 4-part series

In Session 1 of this four-part workshop series, teachers explored the intersection of Indigenous women artists and activism with visual artist America Meredith, a Cherokee Nation citizen and the publishing editor of First American Art Magazine. Teachers also learned about the book Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer. (Originally aired January 2022)

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Teacher Workshop Series | Indigenous Women: Artists and Activists

Part 2 of a 4-part series

In Session 2 of this four-part workshop series, teachers explored the intersection of Indigenous women artists and activism with Joanne Robertson (AnishinaabeKwe), author and illustrator of the children's book Water Walker. Teachers also learned about non-fiction books that highlight Indigenous women's voices and perspectives with Dr. Debbie Reese (Nambé Owingeh), founder of American Indians in Children's Literature. The authors discussed methods for using books and literature tools to deepen student knowledge about Indigenous women's roles and their contributions to environmental issues. (Originally aired February 2022)

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Teacher Workshop Series | Indigenous Women: Artists and Activists

Part 3 of a 4-part series

In Session 3 of this four-part workshop series, teachers explored the intersection of Indigenous women artists and activism through an examination of art from the museum's collections with assistant curator of contemporary art Rebecca Head Trautmann. By studying the work of two gifted women artists, teachers were able to deepen their understanding of complex and painful Native histories and envision ways to introduce students to difficult subjects, including boarding schools and forced removal. Teachers learned how to connect inquiry techniques to their classroom practice and to NMAI's Native Knowledge 360° classroom materials. (Originally aired March 2022)

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Teacher Workshop Series | Indigenous Women: Artists and Activists

Part 4 of a 4-part series

In Session 4 of this four-part workshop series, teachers explored the intersection of Indigenous women artists and activism through poetry, writing, and thinking exercises along with classroom-ready strategies created and introduced by poet Laura Da' (Eastern Shawnee). Teachers learned how to encourage students to develop their ideas and honor multiple world views through a deeper understanding of Indigenous knowledge systems. The workshop also introduced participants to the Library of Congress's Living Nations, Living Words website, which teaches that place is central to identity and explores the richness of Native poets and poems. (Originally aired March 2022)

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

2021 Indigenous Peoples' Day Teach-In Series: Land and Water

Keynote: Indigenous Earth Law

Part 1 of a 3-part series

How would our approach to the climate crisis shift if we were to view Earth as a living relative with protections under law? In this keynote address, Dr. Kelsey Leonard (Shinnecock) explored the emerging area of Earth law, explained its connection to Indigenous law, and charted a path forward for our shared sustainable future. (Originally aired September 2021)

Making Land Acknowledgment Meaningful

Part 2 of a 3-part series

What are land acknowledgments supposed to accomplish and why do we do them? In this interactive session, Renée Gokey, educator and NMAI Teacher Services Coordinator, explored these questions and discussed strategies to make land acknowledgments more thoughtful and respectful to the Indigenous people of your region. Recommended for teachers of K–12. (Originally aired September 2021)

Native Voices in Children's Literature

Part 3 of a 3-part series

In this session, teachers were introduced to children's books by Native writers, criteria for evaluating children's books about Native peoples, and suggestions for using books at story time or for more in-depth cross-disciplinary studies. This discussion was facilitated by Debbie Reese (Nambé Owingeh), educator and founder of American Indians in Children's Literature. Recommended for teachers of grades K–8. (Originally aired September 2021)

2021 NK360° Summer Series | The Power, Authority, and Governance of Native Nations: Understanding United States Federal Indian Policies

The Importance of Federal Indian Policy + Understanding the Colonial and Treaty Eras

Part 1 of a 3-part series

This webinar examined why an understanding of the history of U.S. federal Indian policy is critical to understanding the relationship between Native nations and the United States today. The session began with an introduction to the museum’s national education initiative, Native Knowledge 360° (NK360°), as well as a framing of federal Indian policy eras as they relate to United States history. Dr. David Wilkins (Lumbee Nation of North Carolina) joined to speak about key elements of the Colonial and Treaty eras and their legacy today. To close, Dr. Mark Hirsch, a historian at the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), spoke with Dr. Wilkins about important takeaways for teachers and students with regard to both eras, historically and today. (Originally aired July 2021)

The Human Side of Removal, Allotment, and Assimilation

Part 2 of a 3-part series

This webinar considered how U.S. federal Indian policies impact people and communities on a personal level. Julie Cajune (Salish) and ᎢᏯ ᏗᎯ / iya dihi / Candessa Tehee (Cherokee Nation) both spoke about their communities’ experiences with policies in the Removal, Allotment, and Assimilation eras. Renée Gokey (Eastern Shawnee), Teacher Services Coordinator at the National Museum of the American Indian, then talked with Julie and Candessa about their reflections on the impact and legacy of these policy eras, with attention to how Native communities have been able to survive and thrive despite the challenges and obstacles they encountered. (Originally aired July 2021)

Policy Pendulum Swings: Tribal Reorganization, Termination, and Self-Determination

Part 3 of a 3-part series

This webinar focused on three vastly divergent federal Indian policies and their positive and negative impacts on Native nations historically and today. Dr. Kevin Gover (Pawnee), the Under Secretary for Museums and Culture at the Smithsonian, provided an overview of the Reorganization, Termination, and Self-Determination eras. Dr. Gover brought attention to the fact that throughout every policy era, tribal leaders have continued to display persistence and resilience in their efforts to affirm their rights as nations to govern themselves. Museum staff then highlighted how educators can use NK360° resources to shed light on and make relevant for students different aspects of U.S. federal Indian policy. (Originally aired July 2021)

2021 Living Earth Teach-In Series: Food Sovereignty

2021 Living Earth Teach-In Keynote: The (R)evolution of Indigenous Food Systems of North America

Part 1 of a 3-part series

This Living Earth Teach-In focuses on how to restore and celebrate Indigenous food systems. Watch keynote speaker Chef Sean Sherman (Oglala Lakota), founder/CEO of The Sioux Chef and co-founder of Native American Traditional Indigenous Food Systems (NATIFS), as he explores the history of traditional foods and the movement towards food sovereignty that is gaining ground through his Native American Food Lab. The Living Earth Teach-In is recommended for all K–12 teachers in the subjects of environmental science, history, social studies, and STEAM. (Originally aired March 2021)

2021 Living Earth Teach-In: Traditional Foods Sustain Our Bodies and Spirits

Part 2 of a 3-part series

Renée Gokey (Eastern Shawnee), Teacher Services Coordinator at the National Museum of the American Indian, moderates a panel addressing the importance of traditional foods and food sovereignty in Native communities. Panelists Valerie Segrest (Muckleshoot), Susan Sekaquaptewa (Hopi), and Travis Zimmerman (Lake Superior Chippewa) discuss traditional ecological knowledge and how foods are intricately connected to Indigenous cultures. (Originally aired March 2021)

2021 Living Earth Teach-In: Using NK360° Resources to Teach about Traditional Foods

Part 3 of a 3-part series

Learn about NK360° online resources related to traditional foods, culture, and the environment. In this final session of the 2021 Living Earth Teach-In, Colleen Call Smith, NK360° educator at the National Museum of the American Indian, shares the purpose of Native Knowledge 360°, the museum's National Education Initiative, and connects you with relevant and classroom-ready digital materials. (Originally aired March 2021)

Maya Astronomy and Mathematics—Yesterday and Today

The content in this 75-minute webinar connects to the Living Maya Time online resource, featuring videos of solar alignments with ancestral pyramids and an interactive Maya math activity. Astronomer Dr. Isabel Hawkins provides an optional hands-on strategy for students to measure time and find the cardinal directions by tracking shadows using commonly available household items. Designed and recommended for educators of grades 5–8 who teach history, social studies, or STEM. (Originally aired February 2021)

Teacher Workshop Series | Giving Thanks: Telling More Complete Narratives in Your Classroom

Giving Thanks: Telling More Complete Narratives about the First Thanksgiving

Part 1 of a 2-part series

Session 1 of this two-part series examines how popular Thanksgiving imagery has contributed to false narratives around the first Thanksgiving. Workshop moderators offer tools and strategies for bringing Native voices into the classroom so that teachers can present a more complete narrative about this foundational event. This engaging, interactive workshop is presented by Bert Correa (Taino) Assistant Workshop Coordinator, and Renée Gokey, Teacher Services Coordinator of the Native Knowledge 360° Initiative and a citizen of the Eastern Shawnee Nation of Oklahoma. (Originally aired November 2020)

Giving Thanks: Exploring Thanksgiving through Indigenous Eyes

Part 2 of a 2-part series

Join educator and museum design professional Marissa Manitowabi (Seneca) as she explores the concept of thanksgiving from the worldview of the Haudenosaunee. She also offers an in-depth discussion of The Three Sisters, an example of Native America's profound understanding of horticulture and ecology long before the advent of modern farming techniques. This professional development series was delivered live to more than 700 teachers in the United States and around the world. (Originally aired November 2020)

2020 Indigenous Peoples' Day Teach-In Series: Food and Water Justice

Keynote: Food and Water Justice

Part 1 of a 3-part series

Winona LaDuke (member of the Mississippi Band Anishinaabeg of the White Earth Reservation) is an internationally known activist working on issues of sustainable development, renewable energy, and food systems. Here she speaks online to more than 250 teachers from the United States and around the world taking part in the 2020 Indigenous Peoples' Day Teach-In: Food and Water Justice. The fourth annual teach-in was hosted by the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian and Teaching for Change. The focus of the teach-in was Indigenous peoples' histories and experiences around food and water justice today. (Originally aired September 2020)

The Inka Empire: What Innovations Can Provide Food and Water for Millions?

Part 2 of a 3-part series

The Inka Empire thrived in South America in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Join astronomer and educator Dr. Isabel Hawkins (bilingual/bicultural, from Argentina) of the Exploratorium museum in San Francisco to delve into The Inka Empire: What Innovations Can Provide Food and Water for Millions? This Native Knowledge 360° online lesson highlights Inka-period engineering accomplishments that allowed the Inka to manage their vast and dispersed empire. Discover how their legacy has relevancy in the present day. Explore a variety of sources that reveal how the need to feed and provide water for millions of people across an expansive territory led to Inka innovations in water management and agriculture. Many of these innovations are still in use today by Indigenous communities in the Andes. This teacher workshop session was part of the 2020 Indigenous Peoples' Day Teach-In, hosted by the National Museum of the American Indian and Teaching for Change. (Originally aired September 2020)

American Indian Responses to Environmental Challenges

Part 3 of a 3-part series

Featured on the NMAI's Native Knowledge 360° website, American Indian Responses to Environmental Challenges is an interactive educational resource that teaches how four Native nations are addressing environmental issues in their homelands. Students use online videos, maps, images, and activities to explore case studies of the Akwesasne Mohawk of northern New York, the Campo Kumeyaay Nation of southern California, the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe of northern Minnesota, and the Lummi Nation of Washington State. Students will learn how traditional culture, values, and Indigenous knowledge, along with Western science and technology, inform the environmental work of these contemporary Native nations. This engaging educational resource is presented by Ed Schupman, manager of national education for the Native Knowledge 360° initiative and a citizen of the Muscogee Creek Nation of Oklahoma. (Originally aired September 2020)

2020 NK360° Summer Series | Foundations for Teaching and Learning about Native Americans

Changing the Narrative about Native Americans

Part 1 of a 3-part series

This webinar studies the history of problematic narratives about Native Americans, its impact on society, and why it matters today. This was day one of the 2020 NK360° Summer Series, Foundations for Teaching and Learning about Native Americans. (Originally aired July 2020)

Building More Complete Narratives about Native Americans

Part 2 of a 3-part series

Consider how the strategies students use to investigate primary and secondary sources can help to transform their understanding of Native Americans. This webinar was day two of the 2020 NK360° Summer Series, Foundations for Teaching and Learning about Native Americans. (Originally aired July 2020)

Native Knowledge 360° In Your Classroom

Part 3 of a 3-part series

Watch a demo of a NK360° digital lesson about Northern Plains History and Cultures and consider ways to implement elements of the lesson in the classroom. This webinar was day three of the 2020 NK360° Summer Series, Foundations for Teaching and Learning about Native Americans. (Originally aired July 2020)